The Global Positioning System (GPS) is made up of satellites, ground stations, and receivers..

GPS is a system. It’s made up of three parts: satellites, ground stations, and receivers. Satellites act like the stars in constellations—we know where they are supposed to be at any given time. The ground stations use radar to make sure they are actually where we think they are. A receiver, like you might find in your phone or in your parents car, is constantly listening for a signal from these satellites. The receiver figures out how far away they are from some of them.Once the receiver calculates its distance from four or more satellites, it knows exactly where you are.

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a network of about 30 satellites orbiting the Earth at an altitude of 20,000 km. The system was originally developed by the US government for military navigation but now anyone with a GPS device, be it a SatNav, mobile phone or handheld GPS unit, can receive the radio signals that the satellites broadcast.